A STUDY OF FRENCH RENAISSANCE TYPE
By Barbara Strzeżek, Lara Dautun & Samuel Salminen [2021]
under guidance of Dr. Frank E. Blokland

This is a year-long research-driven process of reviving Renaissance types by Pierre Haultin and Francois Guyot. The source material for this work was De l'institution, usage et doctrine du sainct sacrament, published by Ph. de Mornay (La Rochelle, H. Haultin, 1598). The project included two styles; a roman lowercase derived from Guyot's Double-Pica (Ascendonica, Gros-parangon) (1544), most likely punched by a La Rochelle punch-cutter, paired with capitals of La Rochelle Double-Pica Roman by Haultin (1598) and Guyot's Double-Pica (Ascendonica, Gros-parangon) italic (1557).
 Our process started with a few visits to the Royal Library in The Hague, where we looked through various Renaissance publications printed with movable type from French punch-cutters. Once we had decided on the source models we wanted to revive, we made a thorough scan of the book, making sure we covered all necessary glyphs. Before we started with the practical reviving work we had to trace back the origin of the letters in question by comparing the source material with numerous examples in the library’s catalogue and online.
 Once we felt confident about our conclusions, we started distilling standardised spacing — an intrinsic part of the model — according to the method introduced by Dr. Frank E. Blokland in his dissertation On the origin of patterning in movable Latin type. We then started extracting averages of the printed letters which were necessary for the digitisation. As we began drawing, some key decisions had to be made. When making a revival based on printed type one has to take into consideration the ink squash — the ink spread caused by the dent in the paper and the ink — and decide whether to preserve it in the new design, or to strive for something closer to the matrix. At this point the width of the stem, the construction of the serifs and other details were determined. Subsequently, the roman character set started taking shape; capitals, ligatures and punctuation were added. The patterning we had distilled and applied to our revival matched with the original almost perfectly. Here, we decided to make some modest deviations from the original — mainly regarding spacing and kerning — to make the typeface more suitable for modern use.
 The knowledge acquired from this process became really apparent as we started working on the italic, essentially re-doing all the aforementioned steps. We were a lot more attentive to details and were hence able to avoid many mistakes made while working on the roman. In order to find a balance — a harmonious relation in color and patterning — between the roman and the italic, we decided to take Frank's advice; revisiting the roman to distill the standardised unitization. As expected, the italic fit the same patterning, which made our process a lot smoother moving forward. Nevertheless, the italic came with its own challenges, such as inconsistencies in the characters’ slants. We extended the character set by creating glyphs that were not part of our renaissance source material, as well as some stylistic alternatives for the ornamental swash characters. This project came with many unexpected challenges throughout the whole process. The research part was way less straight-forward than we had anticipated, which made our work quite demanding time-wise, yet very enriching and exciting. Working in a group was very productive, as each of us had complementary centers of interest and contributed with their own point of view.
Hieronimus Italic80px
A B C D E F G H J I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V X Y Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
&
ff fi ffi ſ ſi ſi ſſ ct æ œ
à â é è ê
. : - , ( ? ! ' )
A A B Ca C D E F G G H I I J K K L
M M N N O P Qa Q R R S S T T U V V W W X Y Y Z
a b c d e f g h i j k k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z z
&
ff fi fl ffi ſ ſs ſt ſi ſl ſp fi ll
st ct ggy æ œ as is us ta
à â é è ê
. : - , ( ? ! ' )

A STUDY OF FRENCH RENAISSANCE TYPE
By Barbara Strzeżek, Lara Dautun & Samuel Salminen [2021]
under guidance of Dr. Frank E. Blokland
[work in progress]

This is a year-long research-driven process of reviving Renaissance types by Pierre Haultin and Francois Guyot. The source material for this work was De l'institution, usage et doctrine du sainct sacrament, published by Ph. de Mornay (La Rochelle, H. Haultin, 1598). The project included two styles; a roman lowercase derived from Guyot's Double-Pica (Ascendonica, Gros-parangon) (1544), most likely punched by a La Rochelle punch-cutter, paired with capitals of La Rochelle Double-Pica Roman by Haultin (1598) and Guyot's Double-Pica (Ascendonica, Gros-parangon) italic (1557).
 Our process started with a few visits to the Royal Library in The Hague, where we looked through various Renaissance publications printed with movable type from French punch-cutters. Once we had decided on the source models we wanted to revive, we made a thorough scan of the book, making sure we covered all necessary glyphs. Before we started with the practical reviving work we had to trace back the origin of the letters in question by comparing the source material with numerous examples in the library’s catalogue and online.
 Once we felt confident about our conclusions, we started distilling standardised spacing — an intrinsic part of the model — according to the method introduced by Dr. Frank E. Blokland in his dissertation On the origin of patterning in movable Latin type. We then started extracting averages of the printed letters which were necessary for the digitisation. As we began drawing, some key decisions had to be made. When making a revival based on printed type one has to take into consideration the ink squash — the ink spread caused by the dent in the paper and the ink — and decide whether to preserve it in the new design, or to strive for something closer to the matrix. At this point the width of the stem, the construction of the serifs and other details were determined. Subsequently, the roman character set started taking shape; capitals, ligatures and punctuation were added. The patterning we had distilled and applied to our revival matched with the original almost perfectly. Here, we decided to make some modest deviations from the original — mainly regarding spacing and kerning — to make the typeface more suitable for modern use.
 The knowledge acquired from this process became really apparent as we started working on the italic, essentially re-doing all the aforementioned steps. We were a lot more attentive to details and were hence able to avoid many mistakes made while working on the roman. In order to find a balance — a harmonious relation in color and patterning — between the roman and the italic, we decided to take Frank's advice; revisiting the roman to distill the standardised unitization. As expected, the italic fit the same patterning, which made our process a lot smoother moving forward. Nevertheless, the italic came with its own challenges, such as inconsistencies in the characters’ slants. We extended the character set by creating glyphs that were not part of our renaissance source material, as well as some stylistic alternatives for the ornamental swash characters. This project came with many unexpected challenges throughout the whole process. The research part was way less straight-forward than we had anticipated, which made our work quite demanding time-wise, yet very enriching and exciting. Working in a group was very productive, as each of us had complementary centers of interest and contributed with their own point of view.
Hieronimus Italic80px
A B C D E F G H J I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V X Y Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
&
ff fi ffi ſ ſi ſi ſſ ct æ œ
à â é è ê
. : - , ( ? ! ' )
A A B Ca C D E F G G H I I J K K L
M M N N O P Qa Q R R S S T T U V V W W X Y Y Z
a b c d e f g h i j k k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z z
&
ff fi fl ffi ſ ſs ſt ſi ſl ſp fi ll
st ct ggy æ œ as is us ta
à â é è ê
. : - , ( ? ! ' )